Archive for the ‘migraine’ Category

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Open Journal Article: Common variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 and GRIA3 receptor genes are associated with migraine susceptibility

2010 June 26

Daniela Formicola, Andrea Aloia, Simone Sampaolo, Olimpia Farina, Daria Diodato, Lyn R Griffiths, Fernando Gianfrancesco, Giuseppe Di Ioriol and Teresa Esposito.

BMC Medical Genetics 2010, 11:103doi:10.1186/1471-2350-11-103
Published:     25 June 2010
Abstract (provisional):

Background

Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system which acts by the activation of either ionotropic (AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptors) or G-protein coupled metabotropic receptors. Glutamate is widely accepted to play a major role in the path physiology of migraine as implicated by data from animal and human studies. Genes involved in synthesis, metabolism and regulation of both glutamate and its receptors could be, therefore, considered as potential candidates for causing/predisposing to migraine when mutated.

Methods

The association of polymorphic variants of GRIA1-GRIA4 genes which encode for the four subunits (GluR1-GluR4) of the alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor for glutamate was tested in migraineurs with and without aura (MA and MO) and healthy controls.

Results

Two variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 (rs2195450) and GRIA3 (rs3761555) genes resulted strongly associated with MA (P=0.00002 and P=0.0001, respectively), after correction for multiple comparisons, but not associated with MO, suggesting their role in cortical spreading depression. Whereas the rs548294 variant in GRIA1 gene showed association primarily with MO phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that ma and MO phenotypes could be genetically related. These variants modify binding sites for transcription factors altering the expression of GRIA1 and GRIA3 genes in different conditions.

Conclusions

This study represents the first genetic evidence of a link between glutamate receptors and migraine.

You can read the full article here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2350-11-103.pdf

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Open Journal Article: New uses of the Migraine Screen Questionnaire (MS-Q): validation in the Primary Care setting and ability to detect hidden migraine.

2010 June 9

Miguel J Lainez, Jesus Castillo, Manuel Dominguez, Gemma Palacios, Silvia Diaz and Javier Rejas.

BMC Neurology 2010, 10:39 doi:10.1186/1471-2377-10-39
Published:     8 June 2010

Abstract (provisional):

Background

PC plays an important role in early diagnosis of health disorders, particularly migraine, due to the financial impact of this disease for the society and its impact on patients’ quality of life. The aim of the study was to validate the self-administered MS-Q questionnaire for detection of hidden migraine in the field of primary care (PC), and to explore its use in this setting.

Methods

Cross-sectional, observational, and multicentre study in subjects above 18 years of age patients attending PC centers (regardless of the reason for consultation). A MS-Q score >4 was considered possible migraine. Level of agreement with IHS criteria clinical diagnosis (kappa coefficient), and instrument’s validity properties: sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were determined. The ability of the instrument to identify possible new cases of migraine was calculated, as well as the ratio of hidden disease compared to the ratio obtained by IHS criteria.

Results

A total of 9,670 patients were included [48.9+17.2 years (mean +SD); 61.9% women], from 410 PC centers representative of the whole national territory. The clinical prevalence of migraine according to the IHS criteria was 24.7%, and 20.4% according to MS-Q: Kappa index of agreement 0.82 (p<0.05). MS-Q sensitivity was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.81 – 0.84), specificity 0.97 (95% CI, 0.98 – 0.99), PPV 0.95 (95% CI, 0.94 – 0.96), and NPV 0.94 (95% CI, 0.93 – 0.95). No statistically significant differences were found in the percentages of patients with de novo and hidden migraine identified by MS-Q and by IHS criteria: 5.7% vs. 6.1% and 26.6% vs. 24.1%, respectively.

Conclusions

The results of the present study confirm the usefulness of the MS-Q questionnaire for the early detection and assessment of migraine in PC settings, and its ability to detect hidden migraine.

You can read the full article here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2377-10-39.pdf

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Open Journal Article: Patients with migraine with aura have increased flow mediated dilation

2010 March 16

Fabrizio Vernieri, Leo Moro, Claudia Altamura, Paola Palazzo, Raffaele Antonelli Incalzi, Paolo Maria Rossini and Claudio Pedone.

BMC Neurology 2010, 10:18doi:10.1186/1471-2377-10-18
Published:     10 March 2010
Abstract (provisional):

Background

Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) mediates the arterial dilation following a flow increase (i.e. flow-mediated dilation, FMD), easily assessed in the brachial artery. NO is also involved in cerebral hemodynamics and it is supposed to trigger vascular changes occurring during migraine. This study aimed at investigating whether migraine patients present an altered response to NO also in the peripheral artery system.

Methods

We enrolled 21 migraineurs (10 with aura [MwA], 11 without aura [MwoA]), and 13 controls. FMD was evaluated with ultrasound in all subjects by measuring the percentage increase of the brachial artery diameter induced by hyperaemia reactive to sustained cuff inflation around the arm above systolic pressure. FMD values were then normalized for shear stress.

Results

Normalized FMD values were higher in patients with MwA (28.5 10-2%.s) than in controls (9.0 10-2%.s) and patients with MwoA (13.7 10-2%.s) (p<0.001). FMD was over the median value (19%) in 23.1% of controls, in 45.5% of the MwoA patients, and in 90% of the MwA patients.

Conclusions

Migraineurs with aura present an excessive arterial response to hyperaemia, likely as an effect of an increased sensitivity to endothelium-derived nitric oxide. This phenomenon observed peripherally might reflect similar characteristics in the cerebral circulation.

You can read the full article here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2377-10-18.pdf

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Suspension of “Migraine Daily News”

2010 March 3

From today, I have decided to suspend the “Migraine Daily News”. This is because I need to spend this time working on the new “Headwise Project” site. During this, I will be updating the information on migraine, PMA and visual snow, and visualization.

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Open Journal Article: The association between use of electronic media and prevalence of headache in adolescents: results from a population-based cross-sectional study

2010 February 9

Astrid Milde-Busch, Rudiger von Kries, Silke Thomas, Sabine Heinrich, Andreas Straubel and Katja Radon.

BMC Neurology 2010, 10:12doi:10.1186/1471-2377-10-12
Published:     9 February 2010
Abstract (provisional):

Background

Use of electronic media, i.e. mobile phones, computers, television, game consoles or listening to music, is very common, especially amongst adolescents. There is currently a debate about whether frequent use of these media might have adverse effects on health, especially on headaches, which are among the most-reported health complaints in adolescents. The aim of the present study was to assess associations between frequent use of electronic media and the prevalence of different types of headache in adolescents.

Methods

Data were derived from a population-based sample (n=1,025, ages 13-17 years). Type of headache (i.e. migraine, tension-type headache, unclassifiable headache) was ascertained by standardized questionnaires for subjects reporting headache episodes at least once per month during the last six months. Duration of electronic media use was assessed during personal interviews. Associations were estimated with logistic regression models adjusted for age group, sex, family condition and socio-economic status.

Results

Most of the adolescents used computers (85%), watched television (90%) or listened to music (90%) daily, otherwise only 23% of the participants used their mobile phones and only 25% played with game consoles on a daily basis. A statistically significant association between listening to music and any headache (odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.1 for 30 minutes per day, 2.1; 1.2-3.7 for 1 to 2 hours per day; 2.0; 1.2-3.5 for 3 hours and longer listening to music per day) was observed. When stratifying for type of headache, no statistically significant association was seen.

Conclusions

Apart from an association between listening to music on a daily basis and overall headache, no consistent associations between the use of electronic media and different types of headache were observed.

You can read the full article here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2377-10-12.pdf

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Open Journal Article: Neurofeedback and biofeedback with 37 migraineurs: a clinical outcome study

2010 February 3

Abstract (provisional):

Background

Traditional biofeedback has grade A evidence for effectively treating migraines. Two newer forms of neurobiofeedback, EEG biofeedback and hemoencephalography biofeedback were combined with thermal handwarming biofeedback to treat 37 migraineurs in a clinical outpatient setting.

Methods

37 migraine patients underwent an average of 40 neurofeedback sessions combined with thermal biofeedback in an outpatient biofeedback clinic. All patients were on at least one type of medication for migraine; preventive, abortive or rescue. Patients kept daily headache diaries a minimum of two weeks prior to treatment and throughout treatment showing symptom frequency, severity, duration and medications used. Treatments were conducted an average of three times weekly over an average span of 6 months. Headache diaries were examined after treatment and a formal interview was conducted. After an average of 14.5 months following treatment, a formal interview was conducted in order to ascertain duration of treatment effects.

Results

Of the 37 migraine patients treated, 26 patients or 70% experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of their headaches which was sustained on average 14.5 months after treatments were discontinued.

Conclusions

All combined neuro and biofeedback interventions were effective in reducing the frequency of migraines with clients using medication resulting in a more favorable outcome (70% experiencing at least a 50% reduction in headaches) than just medications alone (50% experience a 50% reduction) and that the effect size of our study involving three different types of biofeedback for migraine (1.09) was more robust than effect size of combined studies on thermal biofeedback alone for migraine (.5). These non-invasive interventions may show promise for treating treatment-refractory migraine and for preventing the progression from episodic to chronic migraine.

You can read the full article here: http://www.behavioralandbrainfunctions.com/content/6/1/9

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Open Journal Article: Diagnosing migraine in research and clinical settings: The validation of the Structured Migraine Interview (SMI)

2010 January 19

Abstract (provisional):

Background
Migraine is a common disorder that is highly co-morbid with psychopathological conditions such as depression and anxiety. Despite the extensive research and availability of treatment, migraine remains under-recognised and undertreated. The aim of this study was to design a short and practical screening tool to identify migraine for clinical and research purposes.


Methods

The structured migraine interview (SMI) based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) criteria was used in a clinical setting of headache sufferers and compared to clinical diagnosis by headache specialist. In addition to the validating characteristics of the interview different methods of administration were also tested.
Results

The SMI has high sensitivity (0.87) and modest specificity (0.58) when compared to headache specialist’s clinical diagnosis.
Conclusions

Our study demonstrated that a structured interview based on the ICHD criteria is a useful and valid tool to identify migraine in research settings and to a limited extent in clinical settings, and could be used in studies on large samples where clinical interviews are less practical.

You can read the full article here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2377-10-7.pdf