Posts Tagged ‘unable to visualize’

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Updating the Site – Progress Report (Amended)

2011 February 8

Some time ago I announced that I was starting the process of updating this site. I also announced that I would like to start a support forum, specifically for those like me who were unable to visualize.

Here is a progress report.

I estimate I am about two-thirds of the way through reading what studies I have been able to find into visualization (the “mind’s eye” or “mental imagery”) online, including related items such as:-

  • Episodic memory (memory of life events),
  • VVIQ (“The Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire”),
  • Dreams,
  • Theory of Mind.

Unfortunately, my efforts are being hampered by numerous time consuming problems with the benefits people at the moment, as my partner has also fallen ill following an accident. But we are both soldiering on and I hope to begin pulling the research together by June, all being well.

Take care.

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Cannot Visualise (Part Three) (Last Edited: 2010 Sep 25)

2008 December 6

Go back to Part 2

This is the final part of a three part series about migraine. You can use the links above or at the end of this page to go back. Or you can jump to any part from the Visualisation FAQs page link; where you can read my list of reported problems.

Please note: This series is now very out of date. I am in the process of updating them with new research that I have found. To learn more, please click this link: https://porillion.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/visualization-forming-mental-images-and-episodic-memory-updates-to-come/

I am also thinking about setting up an online support forum for people with no/low visualization. If you would be interested in this, please leave a comment to the post: https://porillion.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/do-you-want-a-support-forum-if-you-cannot-visualise/


In this final part of the series, I talk about my memory problems. There are two clear aspects about them. The first is that I can’t be sure how much relates to my inability to visualise. The second is that medical science doesn’t seem to recognise persistent episodic amnesia as a condition.

The only people I’ve met who say they have as bad an inability to visualise also say they have very poor episodic memory. So I suspect the two are related. This is why I have taken to calling the condition persistent visualisation deficit, or PVD.

One phrase one of the two people used sums up the condition as it can refer to any event not just parting from a loved one. Writing in a thread (which unfortunately I have lost the link to), he said that when he left someone he loved it was like they no longer existed. At first he found this very distressing. In some ways, there was a sense of loss. After all, if it was someone he cared about he couldn’t picture their face at all. After a while, he slowly came to adapt to the ‘loss’ and the emotion lessened. For him, this became another source of discomfort, because now he felt that somehow this meant he didn’t really care. Which, he said, is clearly not how he felt when he was with the loved one. You can substitute the particular event – leaving a loved one – with any change during a day.

I have described it to the few I’ve talked to about it like this. Imagine you have a collection of many photographic albums. In them you have all the pictures you have taken during your life to date. You have lots of fond memories, and some not so fond. You have important reminders, including things your friends and family have said in conversations. They are special albums, as touching a photo also repeats what was said in those conversations. Below each picture you have a few words like, “Paul and I in Spain in April 2000”.

Now, imagine someone has stolen all the talking photographs from your albums. You no longer have access to any of the vivid images from your past. Worse, you can no longer recall the conversations even from earlier in the week; never mind further back. All you have left are the short summaries. These are all that now hold the thread of your life together. So you know that you and Paul went to Spain in April 2000 (factual); but you can recall nothing without at least a lot of time and effort (episodic).

This is what it is like to live with PVD. Now imagine work and social environments. In a work environment, you can compensate by fixating on certain really vivid and unique features, say, like the clothes a customer wore when he visited. So if he visits again later, you may recall him. If your work has a visit log, then you can adapt and ‘cheat’ by working the conversation round to a way you can look up the visit. Carrying around and using a notebook is usually acceptable in work. In fact, with time and effort you can find any number of ways to adapt…

…except to social situations. Here you don’t have software to help you. And carrying around and using a notebook isn’t usually acceptable in social situations!! So now you find it very hard to adapt. You forget conversations. So you struggle to keep up with chit chat. By the time you recall, if you recall, what was said a day or more ago, the conversation has moved on. Worse, you forget important things – not just people’s names and faces, but that they said their brother was diagnosed with kidney failure.

To others, you may come across as forgetful (true) or worse, selfish and uncaring; socially awkward. In the end, this becomes isolating. And when you turn to medical science for help and answers, there is blank non-acceptance that there’s any problem.

At this time, I have no answer. Are we three the only people on the planet who cannot visualise and have persistent episodic amnesia? Are the two related as PVD? Is migraine in any way involved – one of the other two also has migraine; though this is a common condition. To date, I have no evidence that migraine plays a part, except that my migraine and PVD started sometime around the same point in my life.

  • Do you have persistent episodic amnesia? If so, do you have problems visualising too? Do you have migraine?
  • Or, if you have migraine or problems visualising, do you have what you see as normal episodic memory (memory and recall of life events, casual conversation and so on)?
  • Finally, are you a medical practitioner or researcher who has heard of something like PVD? Can you put a medical name to it?

If you can provide any answers, or if what I have written rings a bell with you and you have no answer, I’d like to hear from you.

Thank you for reading.

Go back to Part 2

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Cannot Visualise (Part Two) (Last Edited: 2010 Sep 25)

2008 November 29

Go back to Part 1 | Go on to Part 3

This is part two of a three part series about migraine. You can use the links above or at the end of this page to go back or forward. Or you can jump to any part from the Visualisation FAQs page link; where you can read my list of reported problems.

Please note: This series is now very out of date. I am in the process of updating them with new research that I have found. To learn more, please click this link: https://porillion.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/visualization-forming-mental-images-and-episodic-memory-updates-to-come/

I am also thinking about setting up an online support forum for people with no/low visualization. If you would be interested in this, please leave a comment to the post: https://porillion.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/do-you-want-a-support-forum-if-you-cannot-visualise/


A quick search on Google will show three things about visualisation:

  • There’s an awful lot of opinion that those who say they can’t visualise actually can,
  • There are a very few people who admit openly that they can’t or have a great deal of difficulty doing so,
  • That there’s practically no obvious research being done looking at the variability of people’s ability to visualise.

So it may be surprising if you can see things in your mind’s eye if someone tells you they can’t, or can only do so in a limited way. It may be more surprising if I told you that in my own case I once could do so, but now can’t. In other words – your ability to visualise can change.

But there is a study on the variability in the “vividness of mental imagery” published openly. It was carried out in 2006 and published in Science Direct in 2007. Link: http://www.hnl.bcm.tmc.edu/articles/ScienceDirect2007.pdf

The study looked at a small group of 8 subjects, 2 females and 6 males, aged 25-31. It looked at three tasks:

  • Subjective vividness rating, in which the subjects described how well they could visualise.
  • A colour naming task, which excluded two additional subjects who scored too low.
  • A visualisation (mental imaging) task while being scanned by an fMRI scanner.

The first task used the vividness of visual imagery questionnaire developed by Marks in 1973. You can find out more on this from this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vividness_of_Visual_Imagery_Questionnaire_(VVIQ).

The colour naming task is explained in the link to the study.

The main part of the study itself looked at whether the subjects’ reported vividness in the VVIQ could be correlated by the fMRI scan. To do this, they were blindfolded and asked to visualise a preset task while scanned. Again, the full details are in the linked document.

The study found a statistically significant correlation between:

  • The objective data from each subject’s visual cortex from the fMRI scan, and
  • The subjective rating of that subject in the VVIQ.

In other words, the person’s own assessment of how well or badly they can visualise is shown in the scan. This confirms that there can indeed be variability in how people can visualise.

Go back to Part 1 | Go on to Part 3

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Cannot Visualise (Part One) (Last Edited: 2010 Sep 25)

2008 November 22

This is part one of a three part series about visualisation and memory problems. You can continue to part two from the link at the bottom of this page. Or you can jump to any part from the Visualisation FAQs page link; where you can read a list of reported problems.

Please note: This series is now very out of date. I am in the process of updating them with new research that I have found. To learn more, please click this link: https://porillion.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/visualization-forming-mental-images-and-episodic-memory-updates-to-come/

I am also thinking about setting up an online support forum for people with no/low visualization. If you would be interested in this, please leave a comment to the post: https://porillion.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/do-you-want-a-support-forum-if-you-cannot-visualise/


One other problem I have had for some years now is that I can’t visualise. By this I mean I can’t see or picture things in my “mind’s eye”. Whenever I talk of this, the other person finds it hard to understand (or believe). If I say that it also affects my memory, things get more interesting. Because I have very poor episodic memory – memory of life events. This is most true for visual memory. I’ve been asked questions like “how do you get around your home?” As if somehow I may be blind! More reasonably, I’ve been asked how I remember where something is in my home. To be honest, I’m not sure – but I usually do! I think I compensate with a kind of physical memory – a memory of how to move around to find something.

One thing I dread is if someone in a car asks me for directions. Because I can’t visualise the route, I’m worried about missing out a turn or landmark. In fact, I’m sure I have. Again, I have to try to feel my way around the directions.

As with persistent migraine aura (PMA) and visual snow (VS), medical science seems to poorly understand all this. I’ve only found one study on the variation in visualisation. I’ve found nothing at all on what I call persistent visualisation deficit (PVD). Now, I’m not suggesting PVD relates to PMA or VS. I’ve no evidence for this (or against). But I do know one other person personally who says they have the same disability in visualisation and episodic memory. But I’ve only read one post on the Internet from a stranger who clearly has the same problem.

Go on to Part 2

Sources

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Episodic_memory
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_image
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vividness_of_Visual_Imagery_Questionnaire_(VVIQ)
http://www.hnl.bcm.tmc.edu/articles/ScienceDirect2007.pdf